As an indie musician, stage performance can leave you highly stressed when you want to see the performance come out very well.


What Can Upset You

For the success of a live performance, the venues must be their best, you must be able to find the concert territory friendly and inviting, and the concert-goers must know how to behave as good fans. A lacuna in any of these three aspects can impact the outcome of a gig. Here are a few things you will not want as an indie musician to happen on the stage.

Unsolicited comments

Some fans might pose as though they are making friendly suggestions while it will be practically impossible for you to make any changes to the show already planned. While you might come across such an embarrassing situation, just thank the fan, say you are bowing to their expertise and do nothing about it.

An unsafe environment

Though the venues must do their bit to ensure the safety of the performers, sometimes an all-out stalker or an intoxicated person can intimidate the performer. During such times, you must be prepared to take the right action from options like calling the cops, asking the disturber’s friends to take them home or getting the bouncer.

Vampire-like fans

Sometimes when you have finished the performance and would like to chill with your band members, some fans might pile up troubles on you in the guise of praising you or wanting more from you. This will often feel like having fangs on your neck and your blood being sucked out making it difficult for you to get out in the broad daylight.

Indifferent staff

Indifferent or hostile staff is something you will not want to see. In many venues, the staff has already listened to a lot of performers. You are just another sucker appearing in front of them. You might find the sound engineer showing up with a bad attitude not willing to understand or cooperate. In best cases, you might get a good compliment from them.

Hecklers

Sometimes you might lose control over yourself while having to deal with a heckler who throws some inappropriate comments. You must find ways to deal with them and not allow them to get under your skin. Stop being nervous and use your wit to deal with such tough situations smartly.

Double booking

It can suck to see the venue you are performing at has been double booked. This can happen with some disorganized talent buyer or a club owner hiring two acts to fill in one slot. This can even get worse when they are not onsite and will leave you to your fate to deal with the other musician on who will actually play.

Broken house gear

Some venues might make the performers check gear thoroughly as it would be done in a lending library. This can create a weird feeling of mistrust. You might feel that you are given a suspicious welcome just because someone stole a gadget sometime back. You might need to just let things go by bearing with the inconvenience in a delicate manner.